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Sneaky Green Frittata

Kanchan KoyaBy Spice Spice Baby  , , , , , ,

October 3, 2014

Nutrition
The US Department of Agriculture suggests 3 cups of dark leafy green vegetables per week. Most adults, let alone children, do not meet those requirements. So why the obsession with leafy greens? Calorie for calorie, leafy green vegetables are the most nutrient-dense food around. They contain minerals like calcium, potassium, iron and magnesium, vitamins B, C, E and K and phytonutrients and antioxidants that augment cardiovascular health, blood sugar regulation, digestion and detoxification. I like to think of them as harboring the energy of the sun. They convert sunlight into chlorophyll so when we eat a plate of leafy greens, we are literally taking in the sun's energy. Because some greens like spinach and Swiss chard have oxalic acid that can prevent the optimal absorption of calcium, it’s good to rotate between chard, kale, spinach, collards and gorgeous Asian greens like bok choy. With the choline in eggs for memory and brain development, good quality protein from eggs and proscuitto and starch from potatoes, this sneaky green frittata is a nutritious and complete meal.

  • Yields: 2 adults and 2 kids as a main

Ingredients

6 large eggs

1/4 cup whole milk

1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

2 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto, coarsely chopped

2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil

2 tablespoons olive oil

1/2 onion, chopped

1 garlic clove, minced

3 medium new potatoes, peeled and diced

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/2 teaspoon smoked or sweet paprika

2 large leaves Swiss chard with thick stems discarded, finely chopped (or other greens of choice)

Directions

Preheat the broiler on high.

Whisk together the eggs, milk, Parmesan cheese, prosciutto and basil in a bowl and set aside.

In a 10 inch diameter ovenproof skillet, heat the oil over a medium flame until shimmering. Add the onion and sauté until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and sauté until fragrant, about a minute. Add the potato, salt and pepper and sauté over medium-low heat until the potato is tender and golden, about 15 minutes. Add the paprika and let it blossom, about 10 seconds, and then immediately add the Swiss chard (or other greens) and soften, about 4 minutes. Add the egg mixture to the pan. Cover and cook over medium low heat until the egg is almost set but the top is still runny, about 2 minutes. Transfer the skillet uncovered to the broiler and allow the top to set until golden brown, 4-5 minutes. Allow it to cool, cut into wedges or bite sized cubes and serve.

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Sneaky Green Frittata

Kanchan KoyaBy Spice Spice Baby  , , , , , ,

October 3, 2014

Nutrition
The US Department of Agriculture suggests 3 cups of dark leafy green vegetables per week. Most adults, let alone children, do not meet those requirements. So why the obsession with leafy greens? Calorie for calorie, leafy green vegetables are the most nutrient-dense food around. They contain minerals like calcium, potassium, iron and magnesium, vitamins B, C, E and K and phytonutrients and antioxidants that augment cardiovascular health, blood sugar regulation, digestion and detoxification. I like to think of them as harboring the energy of the sun. They convert sunlight into chlorophyll so when we eat a plate of leafy greens, we are literally taking in the sun's energy. Because some greens like spinach and Swiss chard have oxalic acid that can prevent the optimal absorption of calcium, it’s good to rotate between chard, kale, spinach, collards and gorgeous Asian greens like bok choy. With the choline in eggs for memory and brain development, good quality protein from eggs and proscuitto and starch from potatoes, this sneaky green frittata is a nutritious and complete meal.

  • Yields: 2 adults and 2 kids as a main

Ingredients

6 large eggs

1/4 cup whole milk

1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

2 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto, coarsely chopped

2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil

2 tablespoons olive oil

1/2 onion, chopped

1 garlic clove, minced

3 medium new potatoes, peeled and diced

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/2 teaspoon smoked or sweet paprika

2 large leaves Swiss chard with thick stems discarded, finely chopped (or other greens of choice)

Directions

Preheat the broiler on high.

Whisk together the eggs, milk, Parmesan cheese, prosciutto and basil in a bowl and set aside.

In a 10 inch diameter ovenproof skillet, heat the oil over a medium flame until shimmering. Add the onion and sauté until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and sauté until fragrant, about a minute. Add the potato, salt and pepper and sauté over medium-low heat until the potato is tender and golden, about 15 minutes. Add the paprika and let it blossom, about 10 seconds, and then immediately add the Swiss chard (or other greens) and soften, about 4 minutes. Add the egg mixture to the pan. Cover and cook over medium low heat until the egg is almost set but the top is still runny, about 2 minutes. Transfer the skillet uncovered to the broiler and allow the top to set until golden brown, 4-5 minutes. Allow it to cool, cut into wedges or bite sized cubes and serve.

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